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Relationship of quadriceps muscle power and optimal shortening velocity with angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in older women

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, October 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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59 Mendeley
Title
Relationship of quadriceps muscle power and optimal shortening velocity with angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in older women
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, October 2017
DOI 10.2147/cia.s146494
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joanna Kostka, Joanna Sikora, Tomasz Kostka

Abstract

The goal of this study was to assess whether angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity is related to muscle function (strength, power and velocity), as well as to assess if ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) and other angiotensin system blocking medications (ASBMs) influence muscle performance in elderly women. Ninety-five community-dwelling elderly women took part in this study. Anthropometric data, blood ACE activity analysis, maximum power (Pmax) and optimal shortening velocity (υopt) of the knee extensor muscles, handgrip strength, physical activity (PA) and functional performance were measured. Women taking ACEI were on average almost 2 years older than the women who did not take ACEI. They took more medicines and were also characterized by significantly lower level of ACE, but they did not differ in terms of PA level, results of functional performance and parameters characterizing muscle functions. No correlations of ACE activity with Pmax and handgrip strength, as well as with PA or functional performance were found. Higher ACE activity was connected with lower υopt for women who did not take any ASBMs (rho =-0.37; p=0.01). Serum ACE activity was not associated with muscle strength, power and functional performance in both ASBM users and nonusers, but was associated with optimal shortening velocity of quadriceps muscles in older women. Further prospective studies are needed to assess if ACEIs or other ASBMs may slow down the decline in muscle function and performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 7 12%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 21 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 23 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,423,193
of 12,292,436 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#892
of 1,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,174
of 344,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#40
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,292,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,254 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,918 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.