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A review of the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of brivaracetam

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Pharmacology : Advances and Applications, January 2018
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3 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

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61 Mendeley
Title
A review of the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of brivaracetam
Published in
Clinical Pharmacology : Advances and Applications, January 2018
DOI 10.2147/cpaa.s114072
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pavel Klein, Anyzeila Diaz, Teresa Gasalla, John Whitesides

Abstract

Brivaracetam (BRV; Briviact) is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) approved for adjunctive treatment of focal (partial-onset) seizures in adults. BRV is a selective, high-affinity ligand for synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) with 15- to 30-fold higher affinity than levetiracetam, the first AED acting on SV2A. It has high lipid solubility and rapid brain penetration, with engagement of the target molecule, SV2A, within minutes of administration. BRV has potent broad-spectrum antiepileptic activity in animal models. Phase I studies indicated BRV was well tolerated and showed a favorable pharmacokinetic profile over a wide dose range following single (10-1,000 mg) and multiple (200-800 mg/day) oral dosing. Three pivotal Phase III studies have demonstrated promising efficacy and a good safety and tolerability profile across doses of 50-200 mg/day in the adjunctive treatment of refractory focal seizures. Long-term data indicate that the response to BRV is sustained, with good tolerability and retention rate. BRV is highly effective in patients experiencing secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Safety data to date suggest a favorable psychiatric adverse effect profile in controlled studies, although limited postmarketing data are available. BRV is easy to use, with no titration and little drug-drug interaction. It can be initiated at target dose with no titration. Efficacy is seen on day 1 of oral use in a significant percentage of patients. Intravenous administration in a 2-minute bolus and 15-minute infusion is well tolerated. Here, we review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical data of BRV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Other 5 8%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 30%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 20%
Neuroscience 8 13%
Chemistry 2 3%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 16 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,149,819
of 12,387,983 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Pharmacology : Advances and Applications
#52
of 113 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,226
of 339,088 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Pharmacology : Advances and Applications
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,387,983 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 113 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,088 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.