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Efficacy, acceptability, and safety of adjunctive aripiprazole in treatment-resistant depression: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Efficacy, acceptability, and safety of adjunctive aripiprazole in treatment-resistant depression: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s156619
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shuxin Luan, Hongquan Wan, Lei Zhang, Hua Zhao

Abstract

Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is common and potentially life-threatening in adults, and the benefits and risks of adjunctive aripiprazole in these patients remain controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the efficacy, acceptability, safety, and quality of life of adjunctive aripiprazole in patients with TRD. RCTs published in PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase were systematically reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and safety profiles of TRD patients who were treated with adjunctive aripiprazole. The main outcome measures included response rate, remission rate, changes from baseline in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Clinical Global Impression-severity (CGI-S), Clinical Global Impression-improvement (CGI-I), 17-Item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17), Sheehan Disability scale (SDS), and Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report Scale (IDS-SR), discontinuation due to adverse events, and adverse events. Risk ratio (RR) or weight mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using a fixed-effects or random-effects model according to the heterogeneity among studies. A total of 8 RCTs involving 2,260 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Adjunctive aripiprazole was associated with a significantly higher remission rate (RR =1.64, 95% CI: 1.42 to 1.89;P<0.001) and response rate (RR =1.45, 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.87;P=0.004) than other treatments. Moreover, adjunctive aripiprazole had greater changes in MADRS score, CGI-S score, CGI-I score, HAM-D17 score, SDS score, and IDS-SR score. There were more patients treated with adjunctive aripiprazole who discontinued their treatments due to adverse events. The incidence of adverse events was significantly higher in the adjunctive aripiprazole group than in other treatment groups. The adjunctive aripiprazole showed benefits in improving the response rate, remission rate, and the quality of life in patients with TRD. However, clinicians should interpret these findings with caution due to the evidence of potential treatment-related side effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 20%
Librarian 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Unspecified 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Unspecified 4 27%
Neuroscience 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,077,760
of 13,786,654 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#845
of 2,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,888
of 354,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#27
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,786,654 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,369 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 354,660 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.