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The effect of flat and textured insoles on the balance of primary care elderly people: a randomized controlled clinical trial

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, February 2018
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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108 Mendeley
Title
The effect of flat and textured insoles on the balance of primary care elderly people: a randomized controlled clinical trial
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, February 2018
DOI 10.2147/cia.s149038
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cecília de Morais Barbosa, Manoel Barros Bértolo, Juliana Zonzini Gaino, Michael Davitt, Zoraida Sachetto, Eduardo de Paiva Magalhães

Abstract

Aging is associated with reduced postural stability and increased fall risk. Foot orthoses have been reported as an adjuvant intervention to improve balance by stimulating foot plantar mechanical receptors and thus increasing somatosensory input. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of flat and textured insoles on the balance of primary care elderly people. Prospective, parallel, randomized, and single-blind trial. A total of 100 subjects from a primary care unit, aged ≥65 years, were randomly assigned to intervention groups with flat insoles (n=33), textured insoles (n=33), or control group (n=34) without insoles. The Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go test were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks. Improvements in the Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go test were noted only in intervention groups with insoles but not in control group. No significant difference was found between flat and textured insoles. Minor adverse effects were noted only in the group with textured insoles. The results suggest that foot orthoses (both flat and textured insoles) are effective in improving balance in primary care elderly people. They may represent a low-cost and high-availability adjuvant strategy to improve balance and prevent falls in this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 19%
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Researcher 8 7%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 30 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 31 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 14%
Sports and Recreations 9 8%
Engineering 6 6%
Neuroscience 5 5%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 29 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2018.
All research outputs
#8,308,897
of 13,789,144 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#817
of 1,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,998
of 271,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#25
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,789,144 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,462 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.