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Neural circuits in anxiety and stress disorders: a focused review

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 956)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
246 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Neural circuits in anxiety and stress disorders: a focused review
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s48528
Pubmed ID
Authors

Israel Liberzon, Elizabeth Duval, Arash Javanbakht

Abstract

Anxiety and stress disorders are among the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders. In recent years, multiple studies have examined brain regions and networks involved in anxiety symptomatology in an effort to better understand the mechanisms involved and to develop more effective treatments. However, much remains unknown regarding the specific abnormalities and interactions between networks of regions underlying anxiety disorder presentations. We examined recent neuroimaging literature that aims to identify neural mechanisms underlying anxiety, searching for patterns of neural dysfunction that might be specific to different anxiety disorder categories. Across different anxiety and stress disorders, patterns of hyperactivation in emotion-generating regions and hypoactivation in prefrontal/regulatory regions are common in the literature. Interestingly, evidence of differential patterns is also emerging, such that within a spectrum of disorders ranging from more fear-based to more anxiety-based, greater involvement of emotion-generating regions is reported in panic disorder and specific phobia, and greater involvement of prefrontal regions is reported in generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. We summarize the pertinent literature and suggest areas for continued investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 246 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 245 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 2%
Student > Master 3 1%
Researcher 3 1%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 <1%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 229 93%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 2%
Psychology 5 2%
Neuroscience 5 2%
Social Sciences 1 <1%
Unspecified 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 229 93%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2019.
All research outputs
#590,979
of 13,237,907 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#17
of 956 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,516
of 278,613 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#3
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,237,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 956 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,613 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.