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Influence of diet and obesity on COPD development and outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
174 Mendeley
Title
Influence of diet and obesity on COPD development and outcomes
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, August 2014
DOI 10.2147/copd.s50111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Corrine Hanson, Erica Rutten, E.F.M. Wouters, Stephen Rennard

Abstract

The global increase in the prevalence and incidence of obesity has called serious attention to this issue as a major public health concern. Obesity is associated with many chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and recently the role of overweight and obesity in lung disease has received new interest. Independently of obesity, diet also plays a role as a risk factor for many chronic diseases, and evidence is accumulating to support a role for diet in the prevention and management of several lung diseases. Chronic obstructive lung disease is the third-leading cause of death globally, and both obesity and diet appear to play roles in its pathophysiology. Obesity has been associated with decreased lung-function measures in population-based studies, with increased prevalence of several lung diseases and with compromised pulmonary function. In contrast, obesity has a protective effect against mortality in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Nutrient intake and dietary patterns have also been associated with lung-function measures and the development and progression of COPD. Taken together, this suggests that a focus on obesity and diet should be part of public health campaigns to reduce the burden of lung disease, and could have important implications for clinicians in the management of their patients. Future research should also focus on elucidating these relationships in diverse populations and age-groups, and on understanding the complex interaction between behavior, environment, and genetics in the development and progression of COPD. The goal of this article is to review current evidence regarding the role that obesity and diet play in the development of COPD, and in COPD-related outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 171 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 18%
Student > Master 29 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 14%
Researcher 15 9%
Other 13 7%
Other 30 17%
Unknown 31 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 65 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 7%
Psychology 6 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Other 21 12%
Unknown 41 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2021.
All research outputs
#12,016,621
of 18,940,883 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#1,275
of 2,081 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,452
of 225,533 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#9
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,940,883 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,081 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,533 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.