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Design and implementation of an empowerment model to prevent elder abuse: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, April 2018
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1 tweeter

Citations

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161 Mendeley
Title
Design and implementation of an empowerment model to prevent elder abuse: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, April 2018
DOI 10.2147/cia.s158097
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fatemeh Estebsari, Maryam Dastoorpoor, Davoud Mostafaei, Narges Khanjani, Zahra Rahimi Khalifehkandi, Abbas Rahimi Foroushani, Hamidreza Aghababaeian, Mohammad Hossein Taghdisi

Abstract

Older adults are more vulnerable to health risks than younger people and may get exposed to various dangers, including elder abuse. This study aimed to design and implement an empowerment educational intervention to prevent elder abuse. This parallel randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2014-2016 for 18 months on 464 older adults aged above 60 years who visited health houses of 22 municipalities in Tehran. Data were collected using standard questionnaires, including the Elder Abuse-Knowledge Questionnaire, Health-Promoting Behavior Questionnaire, Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, Barriers to Healthy Lifestyle, Perceived Social Support, Perceived Self-Efficacy, Loneliness Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and the SCARED (stress, coping, argument, resources, events, and dependence) tool. The intervention was done in twenty 45- to 60-minute training sessions over 6 months. Data analysis were performed using χ2 tests, multiple linear and logistic regression, and structural equation modeling (SEM). The frequency of knowledge of elder abuse, self-efficacy, social support and health promoting lifestyle before the intervention was similar in the two groups. However, the frequency of high knowledge of elder abuse (94.8% in the intervention group and 46.6% in the control group), high self-efficacy (82.8% and 7.8%, respectively), high social support (97.0% and 10.3%, respectively) and high health promoting lifestyle (97.0% and 10.3%, respectively) was significantly higher (P<0.001) and the frequency of elder abuse risk (28.0% and 49.6%, respectively) was significantly less in the intervention group after the intervention. SEM standardized beta (Sβ) showed that the intervention had the highest impact on increase social support (Sβ=0.80, β=48.64, SE=1.70, P<0.05), self-efficacy (Sβ=0.76, β=13.32, SE=0.52, P<0.05) and health promoting behaviors (Sβ=0.48, β=33.08, SE=2.26, P<0.05), respectively. The effect of the intervention on decrease of elder abuse risk was indirect and significant (Sβ=-0.406, β=-0.340, SE=0.03, P<0.05), and through social support, self-efficacy, and health promoting behaviors. Educational interventions can be effective in preventing elder abuse.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 161 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 161 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 16%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Researcher 13 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 23 14%
Unknown 56 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 44 27%
Psychology 27 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 9%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Sports and Recreations 3 2%
Other 10 6%
Unknown 55 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#8,058,631
of 12,846,518 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#826
of 1,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,843
of 270,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#26
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,846,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,320 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.