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Hypomania after augmenting venlafaxine and olanzapine with sarcosine in a patient with schizophrenia: a case study

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2015
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
Title
Hypomania after augmenting venlafaxine and olanzapine with sarcosine in a patient with schizophrenia: a case study
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s75734
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominik Strzelecki, Justyna Szyburska, Olga Kałużyńska, Magdalena Kotlicka-Antczak

Abstract

Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system plays an important and well-established role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Agents with glutamatergic properties such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor coagonists (ie, glycine, D-cycloserine) and glycine transporter type 1 inhibitors (eg, sarcosine, bitopertin) are investigated in schizophrenia with special focus on negative and cognitive symptomatology. In this article, we describe a case of a 34-year-old woman with diagnosis of schizophrenia with persistent moderate negative and cognitive symptoms, a participant of the Polish Sarcosine Study (PULSAR) treated with olanzapine (25 mg per day) and venlafaxine (75 mg per day). During ten weeks of sarcosine administration (2 g per day) the patient's activity and mood improved, but in the following 2 weeks, the patient reported decreased need for sleep, elevated mood, libido and general activity. We diagnosed drug-induced hypomania and recommended decreasing the daily dose of venlafaxine to 37.5 mg per day, which resulted in normalization of mood and activity in about 1 week. After this change, activity and mood remained stable and better than before adding sarcosine, and subsequent depressive symptoms were not noted. We describe here the second case report where sarcosine induced important affect changes when added to antidepressive and antipsychotic treatment, which supports the hypothesis of clinically important glutamate-serotonin interaction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 21%
Student > Master 10 18%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 30%
Psychology 9 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2015.
All research outputs
#7,853,848
of 12,517,383 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,407
of 2,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,564
of 220,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,113 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.