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Is it possible to use highly realistic virtual reality in the elderly? A feasibility study with image-based rendering

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
192 Mendeley
Title
Is it possible to use highly realistic virtual reality in the elderly? A feasibility study with image-based rendering
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, March 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s73179
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philippe Robert, Michel Benoit, Guerchouche Rachid, Petit Pierre-David, Chapoulie Emmanuelle, Manera Valeria, Gaurav Chaurasia, Drettakis George

Abstract

Virtual reality (VR) opens up a vast number of possibilities in many domains of therapy. The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the acceptability for elderly subjects of a VR experience using the image-based rendering virtual environment (IBVE) approach and secondly to test the hypothesis that visual cues using VR may enhance the generation of autobiographical memories. Eighteen healthy volunteers (mean age 68.2 years) presenting memory complaints with a Mini-Mental State Examination score higher than 27 and no history of neuropsychiatric disease were included. Participants were asked to perform an autobiographical fluency task in four conditions. The first condition was a baseline grey screen, the second was a photograph of a well-known location in the participant's home city (FamPhoto), and the last two conditions displayed VR, ie, a familiar image-based virtual environment (FamIBVE) consisting of an image-based representation of a known landmark square in the center of the city of experimentation (Nice) and an unknown image-based virtual environment (UnknoIBVE), which was captured in a public housing neighborhood containing unrecognizable building fronts. After each of the four experimental conditions, participants filled in self-report questionnaires to assess the task acceptability (levels of emotion, motivation, security, fatigue, and familiarity). CyberSickness and Presence questionnaires were also assessed after the two VR conditions. Autobiographical memory was assessed using a verbal fluency task and quality of the recollection was assessed using the "remember/know" procedure. All subjects completed the experiment. Sense of security and fatigue were not significantly different between the conditions with and without VR. The FamPhoto condition yielded a higher emotion score than the other conditions (P<0.05). The CyberSickness questionnaire showed that participants did not experience sickness during the experiment across the VR conditions. VR stimulates autobiographical memory, as demonstrated by the increased total number of responses on the autobiographical fluency task and the increased number of conscious recollections of memories for familiar versus unknown scenes (P<0.01). The study indicates that VR using the FamIBVE system is well tolerated by the elderly. VR can also stimulate recollections of autobiographical memory and convey familiarity of a given scene, which is an essential requirement for use of VR during reminiscence therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 192 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 187 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 44 23%
Student > Bachelor 35 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 14%
Researcher 16 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 29 15%
Unknown 28 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 40 21%
Engineering 25 13%
Computer Science 19 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 6%
Other 41 21%
Unknown 39 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2020.
All research outputs
#4,932,768
of 16,555,656 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#719
of 2,619 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,805
of 230,007 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,555,656 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,619 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,007 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.