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Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Women's Health, January 2015
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Mentioned by

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1 Facebook page

Citations

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53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
Title
Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options
Published in
International Journal of Women's Health, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/ijwh.s68979
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alkatout, Ibrahim, Schubert, Melanie, Garbrecht, Nele, Weigel, Marion Tina, Jonat, Walter, Mundhenke, Christoph, Günther, Veronika

Abstract

Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated and occurs often in elderly women without neoplastic epithelial disorders. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor of the vulva (95%). Pruritus is the most common and long-lasting reported symptom of vulvar cancer, followed by vulvar bleeding, discharge, dysuria, and pain. The gold standard for even a small invasive carcinoma of the vulva was historically radical vulvectomy with removal of the tumor with a wide margin followed by an en bloc resection of the inguinal and often the pelvic lymph nodes. Currently, a more individualized and less radical treatment is suggested: a radical wide local excision is possible in the case of localized lesions (T1). A sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy may be performed to reduce wound complications and lymphedema. The survival of patients with vulvar cancer is good when convenient therapy is arranged quickly after initial diagnosis. Inguinal and/or femoral node involvement is the most significant prognostic factor for survival.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 94 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 21%
Student > Master 18 19%
Student > Postgraduate 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 26 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 68 70%
Unspecified 13 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,201,310
of 5,051,149 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Women's Health
#226
of 289 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,799
of 158,098 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Women's Health
#13
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,051,149 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 289 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,098 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.