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Changes in proinflammatory cytokines and white matter in chronically stressed rats

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, March 2015
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Citations

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54 Mendeley
Title
Changes in proinflammatory cytokines and white matter in chronically stressed rats
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, March 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s78131
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haiyun Xu, Ping Yang, Zhenyong Gao, Handi Zhang, Zeman Fang, Cairu Wu, Qing-Jun Huang

Abstract

Although the pathogenesis of depression, an incapacitating psychiatric ailment, remains largely unknown, previous human and animal studies have suggested that both proinflammatory cytokines and altered oligodendrocytes play important roles in the condition. This study examined these two factors in the brains of rats following unpredictable chronic mild stress for 4 weeks, with the hypothesis that chronic stress may affect oligodendrocytes and elevate proinflammatory cytokines in the brain. After suffering unpredictable stressors for 4 weeks, the rats showed depression-like behaviors, including decreased locomotion in the open field, increased immobility time in the forced swim test, and decreased sucrose consumption and less sucrose preference when compared with controls. Immunohistochemical staining of brain sections showed higher immunoreactivity of proinflammatory cytokines in certain brain regions of stressed rats compared with controls; lower immunoreactivity of myelin basic protein and fewer mature oligodendrocytes were seen in the prefrontal cortex, but no demyelination was detected. These results are interpreted and discussed in the context of recent findings from human and animal studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 53 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 28%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Other 12 22%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 16 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 17%
Psychology 6 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2015.
All research outputs
#11,132,949
of 12,517,383 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,944
of 2,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,182
of 232,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#46
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,479 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.