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Novel targeted therapies in chordoma: an update

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Novel targeted therapies in chordoma: an update
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, May 2015
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s50526
Pubmed ID
Authors

Salvatore Di Maio, Gmaan A. Al Zhrani, Fahad E. Al Otaibi, Abdulrahman Alturki, Esther Kong, Stephen Yip, Robert Rostomily

Abstract

Chordomas are rare, locally aggressive skull base neoplasms known for local recurrence and not-infrequent treatment failure. Current evidence supports the role of maximal safe surgical resection. In addition to open skull-base approaches, the endoscopic endonasal approach to clival chordomas has been reported with favorable albeit early results. Adjuvant radiation is prescribed following complete resection, alternatively for gross residual disease or at the time of recurrence. The modalities of adjuvant radiation therapy reported vary widely and include proton-beam, carbon-ion, fractionated photon radiotherapy, and photon and gamma-knife radiosurgery. As of now, no direct comparison is available, and high-level evidence demonstrating superiority of one modality over another is lacking. While systemic therapies have yet to form part of any first-line therapy for chordomas, a number of targeted agents have been evaluated to date that inhibit specific molecules and their respective pathways known to be implicated in chordomas. These include EGFR (erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib), PDGFR (imatinib), mTOR (rapamycin), and VEGF (bevacizumab). This article provides an update of the current multimodality treatment of cranial base chordomas, with an emphasis on how current understanding of molecular pathogenesis provides a framework for the development of novel targeted approaches.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Other 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2015.
All research outputs
#3,039,634
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#150
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,758
of 233,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#8
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,811 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.