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Brain in flames – animal models of psychosis: utility and limitations

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
Title
Brain in flames – animal models of psychosis: utility and limitations
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s65564
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanne Wolf, Daniele Mattei, Regina Schweibold

Abstract

The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia posits that schizophrenia is a psychopathological condition resulting from aberrations in neurodevelopmental processes caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors which proceed long before the onset of clinical symptoms. Many studies discuss an immunological component in the onset and progression of schizophrenia. We here review studies utilizing animal models of schizophrenia with manipulations of genetic, pharmacologic, and immunological origin. We focus on the immunological component to bridge the studies in terms of evaluation and treatment options of negative, positive, and cognitive symptoms. Throughout the review we link certain aspects of each model to the situation in human schizophrenic patients. In conclusion we suggest a combination of existing models to better represent the human situation. Moreover, we emphasize that animal models represent defined single or multiple symptoms or hallmarks of a given disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 73 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 24%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 4%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 17 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 22 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2015.
All research outputs
#8,185,686
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,090
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,519
of 235,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#30
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.