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Attitudes and beliefs of patients with chronic depression toward antidepressants and depression

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2015
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
Title
Attitudes and beliefs of patients with chronic depression toward antidepressants and depression
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s82563
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabrina Anne Jacob, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad Hassali, Ab Fatah Ab Rahman

Abstract

Many patients have erroneous views with regard to depression and its management, and it was noted that these attitudes and beliefs significantly affected their adherence rates. The primary aim of this study was to determine the attitudes and beliefs of patients with depression toward depression and antidepressants. A secondary aim was to assess the influence of ethnicity on patients' attitudes and beliefs. The study involved patients with chronic depression being followed up at an outpatient clinic at a government-run hospital in Malaysia. Patients' attitudes and beliefs were assessed using the Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire. A total of 104 patients of Malay, Chinese, and Indian ethnic groups met the selection criteria. Chinese patients had significantly negative attitudes and beliefs toward depression and antidepressants compared to Malays and Indians (b=-8.96, t 103=-3.22; P<0.05). Component analysis revealed that 59% of patients believed that antidepressants can cause a person to have less control over their thoughts and feelings, while 67% believed that antidepressants could alter one's personality; 60% believed it was okay to take fewer tablets on days when they felt better, while 66% believed that antidepressants helped solve their emotional problems and helped them worry less. Patients had an overall positive view as to the benefits of antidepressants, but the majority had incorrect views as to the acceptable dosing of antidepressants and had concerns about the safety of the medication. Assessing patients' attitudes and beliefs, as well as the impact of their respective cultures, can be used in tailoring psychoeducation sessions accordingly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 18%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Computer Science 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,039,194
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,674
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,162
of 235,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#47
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.