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A comparative study of COPD burden between urban vs rural communities in northern Thailand

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, June 2015
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
Title
A comparative study of COPD burden between urban vs rural communities in northern Thailand
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, June 2015
DOI 10.2147/copd.s82303
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chaicharn Pothirat, Warawut Chaiwong, Nittaya Phetsuk, Sangnual Pisalthanapuna, Nonglak Chetsadaphan, Juthamas Inchai

Abstract

COPD prevalence and consequent burden are expected to rapidly increase worldwide. Until now, there has been no community-based study of COPD in Thailand. We aimed to compare the prevalence, clinical characteristics, disease severity, previous diagnosis, and management of COPD between urban and rural communities. A population-based cross-sectional study was designed to compare COPD prevalence and burden in rural and urban communities in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The COPD subjects were diagnosed and severity categories assigned using Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. The prevalence between the groups was compared using risk regression analysis. Unpaired t-test and chi-square were used to compare differences between the groups. There were 574 and 293 enrolled subjects with acceptable spirometry, in rural and urban communities respectively. The prevalence of COPD in general and COPD in females was higher in the rural group (6.8% vs 3.7% and 4.4% vs 0.9%, respectively) across all independent variables. However, after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking status, no significant differences were demonstrated. Although the pulmonary function and disease severity between the two groups were not significantly different, the tendency was more pronounced in the rural group (COPD stage III-IV: 65.0% vs 33.3%). Most of the COPD patients in both groups were underdiagnosed (80.0% vs 77.2%) and undertreated (85.0% vs 81.9%). None of the patients in the study had participated in exercise training programs. The prevalence of COPD in general and particularly COPD in females tended to be higher, with more severe disease in the rural community. However, both groups were similarly underdiagnosed and undertreated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Researcher 5 16%
Other 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Unknown 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2015.
All research outputs
#3,457,442
of 5,222,019 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#394
of 637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,516
of 175,665 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#30
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,222,019 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 637 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,665 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.