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Economic value of in vitro fertilization in Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan

Overview of attention for article published in ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR, June 2015
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Economic value of in vitro fertilization in Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan
Published in
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR, June 2015
DOI 10.2147/ceor.s79513
Pubmed ID
Authors

Olena Mandrik, Saskia Knies, Johan (Hans) Severens

Abstract

An economic value calculation was performed to estimate the lifetime net present value of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan. Net lifetime tax revenues were used to represent governmental benefits accruing from a hypothetical cohort of an IVF population born in 2009 using the methodology of generational accounting. Governmental expenses related to this population included social benefits, education and health care, unemployment support, and pensions. Where available, country-specific data referencing official sources were applied. The average health care cost needed to achieve one additional birth from the governmental perspective varied from $2,599 in Ukraine to $5,509 in Belarus. The net present value from the population born using IVF was positive in all countries: for Ukraine ($9,839), Belarus ($21,702), and Kazakhstan ($2,295). The break-even costs of drugs and supplies per IVF procedure is expected to be $3,870, $8,530, and $1,780, respectively. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses based on 5,000 simulations show that the average net present value per person remains positive: $1,894±$7,619, $27,925±$12,407, and $17,229±$24,637 in Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, respectively. Financing IVF may represent a good investment in terms of governmental financial returns, even in lower-income countries with state-financed health care systems such as Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Student > Master 3 20%
Other 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 20%
Psychology 1 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,587,979
of 5,228,922 outputs
Outputs from ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR
#108
of 193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,365
of 178,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR
#14
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,228,922 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 193 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.