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Synchronization within, and interactions between, the default mode and dorsal attention networks in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2018
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Title
Synchronization within, and interactions between, the default mode and dorsal attention networks in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s155478
Pubmed ID
Authors

Muhua Huang, Fuqing Zhou, Lin Wu, Bo Wang, Hui Wan, Fangjun Li, Xianjun Zeng, Honghan Gong

Abstract

The effects of the interactions between the default mode network (DMN) and the dorsal attention network (DAN), which present anticorrelated behaviors, in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) are poorly understood. This study used resting-state functional connectivity (FC) and the Granger causality test (GCT) to examine changes in the undirected and effective functional network connectivity (FNC) between the two networks during the remitting phase in RRMS patients. Thirty-three patients experiencing a clinically diagnosed remitting phase of RRMS and 33 well-matched healthy control subjects participated in this study. First, an independent component (IC) analysis was performed to preprocess the functional magnetic resonance imaging data and select resting-state networks. Then, an FNC analysis and the GCT were combined to examine the temporal correlations between the ICs of the DMN and DAN and to identify correlations with clinical markers. Compared with the healthy subjects, the RRMS patients in the remitting phase showed the following: 1) significantly decreased FC within the DAN in the postcentral gyrus and decreased FC within the DMN in several regions except the parahippocampal gyrus, where increased FC was observed; 2) a relatively stable interaction between the two anticorrelated networks as well as a driving connectivity from the DAN to DMN (IC15); and 3) significantly positive correlations between the connectivity coefficient of the right superior temporal gyrus and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale score (ρ = 0.379, p = 0.036). Adaptive mechanisms that maintain stable interactions might occur between the DMN and DAN during the remitting phase in RRMS patients.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 11%
Unspecified 1 5%
Professor 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 5 26%
Psychology 4 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Sports and Recreations 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2018.
All research outputs
#12,843,746
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#2,069
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#239,684
of 277,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#72
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.