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Frailty transitions and types of death in Chinese older adults: a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
Title
Frailty transitions and types of death in Chinese older adults: a population-based cohort study
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, May 2018
DOI 10.2147/cia.s157089
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zu-yun Liu, Yin-zhi Wei, Li-qing Wei, Xiao-yan Jiang, Xiao-feng Wang, Yan Shi, Hua Hai

Abstract

Little is known about the adverse effects of frailty transitions. In this study, we aimed to characterize the transitions between frailty states and examine their associations with the type of death among older adults in China, a developing country with a rapidly growing aging population. We used data of 11,165 older adults (aged 65-99 years) from the 2002 and 2005 waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS). Overall, 44 health deficits were used to construct frailty index (FI; range: 0-1), which was then categorized into a three-level variable: nonfrail (FI ≤0.10), prefrail (0.10< FI ≤0.21), and frail (FI >0.21). Outcome was four types of death based on bedridden days and suffering state (assessed in the 2008 wave of CLHLS). During the 3-year period, 3,394 (30.4%) participants had transitioned between different frailty states (nonfrail, prefrail, and frail), one-third transitioned to death, and one-third remained in previous frailty states. Transitions to greater frailty (ie, "worsening") were more common than transitions to lesser frailty (ie, "improvement"). Among four categories of frailty transitions, "worsening" and "remaining frail" had increased risks of painful death, eg, with odds ratios of 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.41, 2.62) and 4.75 (95% CI =3.32, 6.80), respectively, for type 4 death (ie, ≥30 bedridden days with suffering before death). This large sample of older adults in China supports that frailty is a dynamic process, characterized by frequent types of transitions. Furthermore, those who remained frail had the highest likelihood of experiencing painful death, which raises concerns about the quality of life in frail populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Professor 4 9%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 10 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,133,790
of 13,796,475 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#147
of 1,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,737
of 272,188 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#8
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,796,475 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,188 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.