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Telomere length in blood cells is related to the chronicity, severity, and recurrence rate of schizophrenia

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Telomere length in blood cells is related to the chronicity, severity, and recurrence rate of schizophrenia
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s82468
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tomasz Pawelczyk, Bozena Szymanska, Marta Grancow, Magdalena Kotlicka-Antczak, Agnieszka Pawelczyk

Abstract

Telomere shortening is strongly associated with higher mortality rates and has been shown in a number of age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disorders, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease, and psychiatric disorders. Oxidative stress is known to induce DNA breaks and genome instability. Telomeric DNA rich in guanosine is particularly sensitive to such oxidative damages. Psychosis is associated with a disequilibrium between free radical production and antioxidative defense. Although telomere attrition has been demonstrated in schizophrenia, no relationship has been reported between telomere length and severity of schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to identify differences in telomere length in peripheral blood cells between patients with chronic schizophrenia (C-SCZ) and early schizophrenia (E-SCZ) and to identify any relationship between telomere length and disease chronicity and severity. Relative average telomere lengths were determined using qPCR assay in patients with E-SCZ (n=42) and C-SCZ (n=44) hospitalized due to schizophrenia exacerbation. E-SCZ was diagnosed when less than 2 years had passed since the beginning of psychotic symptoms. The severity of symptoms was assessed using appropriate scales. The severity of schizophrenia symptoms, as well as the number of psychotic episodes and hospital admissions, correlated significantly with telomere length in univariate analyses. Regression analysis revealed that a model incorporating study group (E-SCZ or C-ECZ), sex, and age, as well as the combined number of documented psychotic episodes and hospital admissions, can significantly predict the length of telomeres in patients with schizophrenia, with over 50% of variance in telomere length explained by the model (adjusted R (2)=0.512). The results of the current study indicate that the recurrence of psychotic symptoms as well as their intensity and chronicity may be correlated with telomere attrition, which is well known to contribute to the development of premature senescence and age-related diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 46 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 17%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 14 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 15%
Neuroscience 5 10%
Psychology 4 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 23 48%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2015.
All research outputs
#1,256,892
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#169
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,381
of 233,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#8
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.