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Flow cytometry for intracellular SPION quantification: specificity and sensitivity in comparison with spectroscopic methods

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Nanomedicine, June 2015
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49 Mendeley
Title
Flow cytometry for intracellular SPION quantification: specificity and sensitivity in comparison with spectroscopic methods
Published in
International Journal of Nanomedicine, June 2015
DOI 10.2147/ijn.s82714
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ralf P Friedrich, Christina Janko, Marina Pöttler, Philipp Tripal, Jan Zaloga, Iwona Cicha, Stephan Dürr, Johannes Nowak, Stefan Odenbach, Ioana Slabu, Maik Liebl, Lutz Trahms, Marcus Stapf, Ingrid Hilger, Stefan Lyer, Christoph Alexiou

Abstract

Due to their special physicochemical properties, iron nanoparticles offer new promising possibilities for biomedical applications. For bench to bedside translation of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), safety issues have to be comprehensively clarified. To understand concentration-dependent nanoparticle-mediated toxicity, the exact quantification of intracellular SPIONs by reliable methods is of great importance. In the present study, we compared three different SPION quantification methods (ultraviolet spectrophotometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, atomic adsorption spectroscopy) and discussed the shortcomings and advantages of each method. Moreover, we used those results to evaluate the possibility to use flow cytometric technique to determine the cellular SPION content. For this purpose, we correlated the side scatter data received from flow cytometry with the actual cellular SPION amount. We showed that flow cytometry provides a rapid and reliable method to assess the cellular SPION content. Our data also demonstrate that internalization of iron oxide nanoparticles in human umbilical vein endothelial cells is strongly dependent to the SPION type and results in a dose-dependent increase of toxicity. Thus, treatment with lauric acid-coated SPIONs (SEON(LA)) resulted in a significant increase in the intensity of side scatter and toxicity, whereas SEON(LA) with an additional protein corona formed by bovine serum albumin (SEON(LA-BSA)) and commercially available Rienso(®) particles showed only a minimal increase in both side scatter intensity and cellular toxicity. The increase in side scatter was in accordance with the measurements for SPION content by the atomic adsorption spectroscopy reference method. In summary, our data show that flow cytometry analysis can be used for estimation of uptake of SPIONs by mammalian cells and provides a fast tool for scientists to evaluate the safety of nanoparticle products.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 37%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Researcher 4 8%
Professor 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 14%
Chemistry 5 10%
Materials Science 3 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 13 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,808,899
of 5,291,770 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#766
of 1,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,202
of 187,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#86
of 124 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,291,770 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,392 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,163 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 124 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.