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Muscle and intensity based hamstring exercise classification in elite female track and field athletes: implications for exercise selection during rehabilitation

Overview of attention for article published in Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 223)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
127 tweeters
facebook
16 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
353 Mendeley
Title
Muscle and intensity based hamstring exercise classification in elite female track and field athletes: implications for exercise selection during rehabilitation
Published in
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.2147/oajsm.s79189
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikos Malliaropoulos, Tsaklis Panagiotis, Mendiguchia Jurdan, Korakakis Vasilis, Pyne Debasish, Malliaras Peter, Kyriakos Tsapralis

Abstract

Hamstring injuries are common in many sports, including track and field. Strains occur in different parts of the hamstring muscle but very little is known about whether common hamstring loading exercises specifically load different hamstring components. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation of different components of the hamstring muscle during common hamstring loading exercises. Twenty elite female track and field athletes were recruited into this study, which had a single-sample, repeated-measures design. Each athlete performed ten hamstring loading exercises, and an electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from the biceps femoris and semitendinosus components of the hamstring. Hamstring EMG during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was used to normalize the mean data across ten repetitions of each exercise. An electrogoniometer synchronized to the EMG was used to determine whether peak EMG activity occurred during muscle-tendon unit lengthening, shortening, or no change in length. Mean EMG values were compared between the two recording sites for each exercise using the Student's t-test. The lunge, dead lift, and kettle swings were low intensity (<50% MVIC) and all showed higher EMG activity for semitendinosus than for biceps femoris. Bridge was low but approaching medium intensity, and the TRX, hamstring bridge, and hamstring curl were all medium intensity exercises (≥50% or <80% MVIC). The Nordic, fitball, and slide leg exercises were all high intensity exercises. Only the fitball exercise showed higher EMG activity in the biceps femoris compared with the semitendinosus. Only lunge and kettle swings showed peak EMG in the muscle-tendon unit lengthening phase and both these exercises involved faster speed. Some exercises selectively activated the lateral and medial distal hamstrings. Low, medium, and high intensity exercises were demonstrated. This information enables the clinician, strength and conditioning coach and physiotherapist to better understand intensity- and muscle-specific activation during hamstring muscle rehabilitation. Therefore, these results may help in designing progressive strengthening and rehabilitation and prevention programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 127 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 353 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 4 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Qatar 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 341 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 83 24%
Student > Master 69 20%
Student > Postgraduate 30 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 7%
Other 75 21%
Unknown 44 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 157 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 59 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 48 14%
Engineering 8 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 2%
Other 20 6%
Unknown 55 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 89. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2020.
All research outputs
#254,416
of 16,212,423 outputs
Outputs from Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine
#6
of 223 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,937
of 233,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine
#1
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,212,423 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 223 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,855 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.