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Epigenetic and developmental influences on the risk of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 302)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
186 Mendeley
Title
Epigenetic and developmental influences on the risk of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome
Published in
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, June 2015
DOI 10.2147/dmso.s61296
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelli Ryckman, Caitlin Smith

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is characterized by the presence of a variety of metabolic disturbances including obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and elevated fasting blood sugar. Although the risk for metabolic syndrome has largely been attributed to adult lifestyle factors such as poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and smoking, there is now strong evidence suggesting that predisposition to the development of metabolic syndrome begins in utero. First posited by Hales and Barker in 1992, the "thrifty phenotype" hypothesis proposes that susceptibility to adult chronic diseases can occur in response to exposures in the prenatal and perinatal periods. This hypothesis has been continually supported by epidemiologic studies and studies involving animal models. In this review, we describe the structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes that occur in response to adverse intrauterine environments including prenatal and postnatal diet, maternal obesity, and pregnancy complications. Given the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in both the developed and developing worlds, a greater understanding and appreciation for the role of the intrauterine environment in adult chronic disease etiology is imperative.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 1%
Mexico 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Cuba 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 176 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 18%
Student > Bachelor 24 13%
Researcher 22 12%
Unspecified 14 8%
Other 52 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 55 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 19%
Unspecified 21 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 5%
Other 26 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2018.
All research outputs
#821,471
of 12,706,057 outputs
Outputs from Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy
#29
of 302 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,784
of 231,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,706,057 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 302 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,972 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.