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Impact of parental cancer on IQ, stress resilience, and physical fitness in young men

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epidemiology, May 2018
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1 tweeter

Citations

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7 Mendeley
Title
Impact of parental cancer on IQ, stress resilience, and physical fitness in young men
Published in
Clinical Epidemiology, May 2018
DOI 10.2147/clep.s152210
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruoqing Chen, Katja Fall, Kamila Czene, Beatrice Kennedy, Unnur Valdimarsdóttir, Fang Fang

Abstract

A parental cancer diagnosis is a stressful life event, potentially leading to increased risks of mental and physical problems among children. This study aimed to investigate the associations of parental cancer with IQ, stress resilience, and physical fitness of the affected men during early adulthood. In this Swedish population-based study, we included 465,249 men born during 1973-1983 who underwent the military conscription examination around the age of 18 years. We identified cancer diagnoses among the parents of these men from the Cancer Register. IQ, stress resilience, and physical fitness of the men were assessed at the time of conscription and categorized into three levels: low, moderate, and high (reference category). We used multinomial logistic regression to assess the studied associations. Overall, parental cancer was associated with higher risks of low stress resilience (relative risk ratio [RRR]: 1.09 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.15]) and low physical fitness (RRR: 1.12 [95% CI 1.05-1.19]). Stronger associations were observed for parental cancer with a poor expected prognosis (low stress resilience: RRR: 1.59 [95% CI 1.31-1.94]; low physical fitness: RRR: 1.45 [95% CI 1.14-1.85]) and for parental death after cancer diagnosis (low stress resilience: RRR: 1.29 [95% CI 1.16-1.43]; low physical fitness: RRR: 1.40 [95% CI 1.23-1.59]). Although there was no overall association between parental cancer and IQ, parental death after cancer diagnosis was associated with a higher risk of low IQ (RRR: 1.11 [95% CI 1.01-1.24]). Parental cancer, particularly severe and fatal type, is associated with higher risks of low stress resilience and low physical fitness among men during early adulthood. Men who experienced parental death after cancer diagnosis also have a higher risk of low IQ.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 29%
Unspecified 2 29%
Student > Master 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 29%
Psychology 1 14%
Social Sciences 1 14%
Sports and Recreations 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2018.
All research outputs
#10,356,570
of 12,980,672 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epidemiology
#305
of 403 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,168
of 271,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epidemiology
#15
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,980,672 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 403 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,250 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.