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Differences in maladaptive schemas between patients suffering from chronic and acute posttraumatic stress disorder and healthy controls

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
Title
Differences in maladaptive schemas between patients suffering from chronic and acute posttraumatic stress disorder and healthy controls
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s85959
Pubmed ID
Authors

Serge Brand, Alireza Ahmadian, Jafar Mirzaee, Maryam Omidbeygi, Edith Holsboer-Trachsler

Abstract

War, as a stressor event, has a variety of acute and chronic negative consequences, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this context, early maladaptive schema-based problems in PTSD have recently become an important research area. The aim of this study was to assess early maladaptive schemas in patients with acute and chronic PTSD. Using available sampling methods and diagnostic criteria, 30 patients with chronic PTSD, 30 patients with acute PTSD, and 30 normal military personnel who were matched in terms of age and wartime experience were selected and assessed with the Young Schema Questionnaire-Long Form, Beck Depression Inventory second version (BDI-II), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Impact of Events Scale (IES). Both acute and chronic PTSD patients, when compared with normal military personnel, had higher scores for all early maladaptive schemas. Additionally, veterans suffering from chronic PTSD, as compared with veterans suffering from acute PTSD and veterans without PTSD, reported more impaired schemas related, for instance, to Self-Control, Social Isolation, and Vulnerability to Harm and Illness. The results of the present study have significant preventative, diagnostic, clinical, research, and educational implications with respect to PTSD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Unspecified 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2015.
All research outputs
#14,818,336
of 22,816,807 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,595
of 2,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,845
of 263,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#63
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,816,807 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,985 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,426 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.