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Feasibility and safety of rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism.

Overview of attention for article published in Vascular Health and Risk Management, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
Title
Feasibility and safety of rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism.
Published in
Vascular Health and Risk Management, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/vhrm.s81411
Pubmed ID
Authors

Axel Schlitt, Heinz Voeller, Stephan Gielen, Bernd Schmidt, Christiane Girschick, Dietrich Stoevesandt, Frank Noack, Birgit Pflaumbaum, Mroawan Amoury, Noack, Frank, Schmidt, Bernd, Amoury, Mroawan, Stoevesandt, Dietrich, Gielen, Stephan, Pflaumbaum, Birgit, Girschick, Christiane, Völler, Heinz, Schlitt, Axel

Abstract

Venous thromboembolism is a life-threatening disease. In survivors, different degrees of functional complaints need to be restored or prevented (eg, post-thrombotic syndrome, pulmonary hypertension). Therefore, rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism is recommended in Germany. However, a structured rehabilitation program has not been defined for this indication. Here, we present the experience of a single rehabilitation center. Data from consecutive pulmonary embolism (PE) patients who were referred for a 3-week inpatient rehabilitation program from 2006 to 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. In all, 422 patients were identified. The mean age was 63.9±13.5 years, the mean body mass index (BMI) was 30.6±6.2 kg/m(2), and 51.9% were female. Deep vein thrombosis according to PE was known for 55.5% of all patients. We applied a wide range of therapeutic interventions such as bicycle training with monitored heart rate in 86.7%, respiratory training in 82.5%, aquatic therapy/swimming in 40.1%, and medical training therapy in 14.9% of all patients. Adverse events (AEs) occurred in 57 patients during the 3-week rehabilitation period. The most common AEs were cold (n=6), diarrhea (n=5), and infection of the upper or lower respiratory tract that was treated with antibiotics (n=5). However, three patients under anticoagulation therapy suffered from bleeding, which was clinically relevant in one. Four patients (0.9%) had to be transferred to a primary care hospital for non-PE-associated reasons (acute coronary syndrome, pharyngeal abscess, and acute abdominal problems). No influence of any of the physical activity interventions on the incidence of any AE was found. Since PE is a life-threatening disease, it seems reasonable to recommend rehabilitation at least in PE patients with an intermediate or high risk. It is shown for the first time in this study that a standard rehabilitation program after PE is safe. However, efficacy and safety in the long term need to be studied prospectively.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 107 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Master 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Other 9 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 26 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 11%
Sports and Recreations 8 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 34 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,573,271
of 22,816,807 outputs
Outputs from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#180
of 757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,647
of 353,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#9
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,816,807 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 757 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 353,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.