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What pulmonologists think about the asthma–COPD overlap syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
Title
What pulmonologists think about the asthma–COPD overlap syndrome
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, July 2015
DOI 10.2147/copd.s88667
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marc Miravitlles, Bernardino Alcazar, Fracisco Alvarez-Gutierrez, Teresa Bazús, Myriam Calle, Ciro Casanova, Carolina Cisneros, Juan de-Torres, Luis Entrenas, Cristóbal Esteban, Patricia García-Sidro, Borja G Cosio, Arturo Huerta, Milagros Iriberri, José Luis Izquierdo, Antolin López-Viña, José Luis López-Campos, Eva Martinez-Moragon, Luis Pérez de Llano, Miguel Perpiñá, José Ros, José Serrano, Juan José Soler-Cataluña, Alfons Torrego, Vicente Plaza, Isabel Urrutia

Abstract

Some patients with COPD may share characteristics of asthma; this is the so-called asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). There are no universally accepted criteria for ACOS, and most treatments for asthma and COPD have not been adequately tested in this population. We performed a survey among pulmonology specialists in asthma and COPD aimed at collecting their opinions about ACOS and their attitudes in regard to some case scenarios of ACOS patients. The participants answered a structured questionnaire and attended a face-to-face meeting with the Metaplan methodology to discuss different aspects of ACOS. A total of 26 pulmonologists with a mean age of 49.7 years participated in the survey (13 specialists in asthma and 13 in COPD). Among these, 84.6% recognized the existence of ACOS and stated that a mean of 12.6% of their patients might have this syndrome. In addition, 80.8% agreed that the diagnostic criteria for ACOS are not yet well defined. The most frequently mentioned characteristics of ACOS were a history of asthma (88.5%), significant smoking exposure (73.1%), and postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <0.7 (69.2%). The most accepted diagnostic criteria were eosinophilia in sputum (80.8%), a very positive bronchodilator test (69.2%), and a history of asthma before 40 years of age (65.4%). Up to 96.2% agreed that first-line treatment for ACOS was the combination of a long-acting β2-agonist and inhaled steroid, with a long-acting antimuscarinic agent (triple therapy) for severe ACOS. Most Spanish specialists in asthma and COPD agree that ACOS exists, but the diagnostic criteria are not yet well defined. A previous history of asthma, smoking, and not fully reversible airflow limitation are considered the main characteristics of ACOS, with the most accepted first-line treatment being long-acting β2-agonist/inhaled corticosteroids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 63 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 18%
Other 10 15%
Professor 8 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 14 22%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 62%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2016.
All research outputs
#9,003,535
of 15,689,103 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#961
of 1,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,257
of 232,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#28
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,689,103 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,525 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.