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Risk assessment of night-eating syndrome occurrence in women in Poland, considering the obesity factor in particular

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2018
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Citations

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18 Mendeley
Title
Risk assessment of night-eating syndrome occurrence in women in Poland, considering the obesity factor in particular
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s159562
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominik Olejniczak, Dorota Bugajec, Anna Staniszewska, Mariusz Panczyk, Aleksandra Kielan, Aleksandra Czerw, Marta Mańczuk, Grzegorz Juszczyk, Joanna Skonieczna, Anna Brytek-Matera

Abstract

Night-eating syndrome (NES) involves uncontrolled and most often repeated binge eating during the night. It is related with mood disorders as well as sleep disorders and it may cause obesity. Risks related to NES are obesity, binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, affective disorders, and sleep disorders. The objective of this study is to analyze eating habits in terms of the risk assessment of NES occurrence in the population of women in the Masovian Voivodeship (in Poland). Six hundred and eleven women living in the Masovian Voivodeship participated in the study. The average age of the respondents was 22.7 years (median = 23.0; interquartile range = 3.0). The Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ) was used to assess the risk of NES. In the studied group of women, 1.3% of cases (N = 12) reached a NEQ total score of ≥25, which indicates a probability of 40.7% for NES, while 0.7% (N = 4) reached a score of ≥30, which indicates a probability of 72.2% for occurrence of this syndrome. The highest average total score was observed in the group of obese people. The level of education of the participants did not significantly affect the NEQ score. A weak correlation was observed between the place of residence variable and the mood/sleep subscale (r = 0.11, P < 0.01). NES may be one of the causes of overweight and obesity; therefore, the need for further studies on this health issue is justified. It is worth pointing out that knowing the conditions responsible for the occurrence of NES, it is possible to suggest a prevention procedure for this condition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Researcher 2 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Psychology 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2018.
All research outputs
#8,209,955
of 13,090,338 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,449
of 2,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,490
of 270,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#48
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,090,338 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,210 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.