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Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, risky behaviors, and motorcycle injuries: a case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, risky behaviors, and motorcycle injuries: a case-control study
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s87614
Pubmed ID
Authors

Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani, Leila Abedi, Minoo Mahini, Shahrokh Amiri, Dvoud Khorasani Zavareh

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the association of motorcycle traffic injuries with motorcycle riding behavior and subtypes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) while controlling for individual correlates of motorcycle traffic injuries. A case-control study was carried out in 298 patients with motorcycle trauma along with 151 control patients admitted to the Shohada and Imam Reza university hospitals as the two referral specialty centers in the East Azarbyjan Province of Iran in 2013. The Persian version of the Motorcycle Riding Behavior Questionnaire and the Persian version of Conner's Adult ADHD Rating Scales (the self-report short version) were used to assess riding behavior and screen for adult ADHD, respectively. The scale has four subscales, comprising subscale A (inattention), subscale B (hyperactivity, impulsivity), subscale C (A + C), and subscale D (ADHD index). The statistical analysis was done using Stata version 11. All subjects were male and aged 13-79 years. Approximately 54% of the participants were married and 13% had academic education. Approximately 18% of the motorcycle riders stated that their motorcycle riding was only for fun purposes. More than two thirds of the participants did not have a motorcycle riding license. Variables found to be significantly associated with motorcycle injuries in bivariate analysis included age, marital status, educational level, having a motorcycle riding license, using a helmet while riding, daily amount of riding, riding just for fun, riding behavior score, and ADHD scale scores. It was found in multivariate analysis that if the ADHD index (subscale D) score was used to assess the association of ADHD with motorcycle injuries, a protective role for ADHD was observed. However, the two other subscales showed a different predictive pattern for subscale A versus subscale B, with only subscale B increasing the likelihood of motorcycle traffic injuries. The score based on motorcycle rider behavior was found to be associated with motorcycle injuries. Other variables that were significant in multivariate models were the purpose of riding, educational level, economic status, and marital status. ADHD and riding behavior scores affect the likelihood of motorcycle traffic injuries among motorcycle riders independent of other injury indicators, and include education, purpose of riding, and economic status.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 23%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Psychology 6 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 12%
Engineering 3 7%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Other 9 21%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2015.
All research outputs
#8,379,012
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,168
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,287
of 236,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#67
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,013 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.