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Influence of different soccer-specific maximal actions on physiological, perceptual and accelerometer measurement loads

Overview of attention for article published in Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2018
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Title
Influence of different soccer-specific maximal actions on physiological, perceptual and accelerometer measurement loads
Published in
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.2147/oajsm.s167347
Pubmed ID
Authors

Terje Dalen, Ørjan Øverås, Roland van den Tillaar, Boye Welde, Erna Dianne von Heimburg

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different soccer-specific maximal actions (Continuous run, Sprint, Sprint with change of direction [Sprint COD], Jump and Shot) upon physiological (oxygen uptake and heart rate) and perceptual (rating of perceived exertion [RPE]) responses and accelerometer load. Ten moderately to well-trained male soccer players volunteered to serve as subjects in this study. A repeated within-subject design was used in which each subject was tested on five occasions on different days, one test each day, during a period of 2 weeks. Each of the five tests had a distance of 900 m and lasted 5 minutes, thus the mean speed for all five tests was 3 m/s. During the test, oxygen uptake, heart rate and accelerometer load were measured. Immediately after each test, RPE was recorded, and after the test, oxygen uptake was measured for 5 minutes while the subject sat in an upright position on a chair. In the comparison of different soccer-specific maximal actions upon physiological and perceptual responses and accelerometer load, this study found that the total accelerometer load was lowest in Sprint and Sprint COD conditions, although the physiological (oxygen uptake and heart rate) and perceptual (RPE) responses were highest in the respective conditions. The Jump condition experienced lower RPE than Sprint and Sprint COD but achieved the highest accelerometer load. Accelerometer load is not a valid measurement for energy costs or RPE but may function as a complementary tool to investigate the player loads during matches and training.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 21 62%
Unspecified 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2018.
All research outputs
#12,839,321
of 14,564,327 outputs
Outputs from Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#235,245
of 273,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
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