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Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month rando­mized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
142 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
593 Mendeley
Title
Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month rando­mized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/cia.s87732
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eling de Bruin, Nathan Theill, Patrick Eggenberger, Marius Angst, Vera Schumacher, Eggenberger, Patrick, Schumacher, Vera, Angst, Marius, Theill, Nathan, de Bruin, Eling D

Abstract

Cognitive impairment is a health problem that concerns almost every second elderly person. Physical and cognitive training have differential positive effects on cognition, but have been rarely applied in combination. This study evaluates synergistic effects of multicomponent physical exercise complemented with novel simultaneous cognitive training on cognition in older adults. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive-physical components would add training specific cognitive benefits compared to exclusively physical training. Seniors, older than 70 years, without cognitive impairment, were randomly assigned to either: 1) virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE), 2) treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY), or 3) treadmill walking (PHYS). Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline, after 3 and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were calculated. Eighty-nine participants were randomized to the three groups initially, 71 completed the training, while 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. Advantages of the simultaneous cognitive-physical programs were found in two dimensions of executive function. "Shifting attention" showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE/MEMORY versus PHYS (F[2, 68] =1.95, trend P=0.075, r=0.17); and "working memory" showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE versus MEMORY (F[1, 136] =2.71, trend P=0.051, R (2)=0.006). Performance improvements in executive functions, long-term visual memory (episodic memory), and processing speed were maintained at follow-up in all groups. Particular executive functions benefit from simultaneous cognitive-physical training compared to exclusively physical multicomponent training. Cognitive-physical training programs may counteract widespread cognitive impairments in the elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 593 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 586 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 97 16%
Student > Master 92 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 69 12%
Researcher 49 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 40 7%
Other 84 14%
Unknown 162 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 78 13%
Sports and Recreations 75 13%
Psychology 74 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 61 10%
Neuroscience 37 6%
Other 77 13%
Unknown 191 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,882,821
of 17,356,510 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#230
of 1,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,245
of 244,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#7
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,356,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,598 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,791 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.