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Polypharmacy in pediatric patients and opportunities for pharmacists' involvement

Overview of attention for article published in Integrated Pharmacy Research and Practice, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
Polypharmacy in pediatric patients and opportunities for pharmacists' involvement
Published in
Integrated Pharmacy Research and Practice, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/iprp.s64535
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexis Horace, Fahamina Ahmed

Abstract

Rates of chronic conditions among pediatrics have been steadily increasing and medications used to treat these conditions have also shown a proportional increase. Most clinical trials focus on the safety of solitary medications in adult patients. However, data from these trials are often times extrapolated for use in pediatric patients who have different pharmacokinetic processes and physical profiles. As research increases and more drugs become available for pediatric use, the issue of polypharmacy becomes more of a concern. Polypharmacy is defined as the practice of administering or using multiple medications concurrently for the treatment of one to several medical disorders. With the increased rates of diagnosed complex disease states as prescribed mediations in pediatric patients, the prevalence and effect of polypharmacy in this patient population is largely a mystery. Polypharmacy falls within the realm of expertise of specialized pharmacists who can undertake medication therapy management services, medical chart reviews, and other services in pediatrics. Pharmacists have the time and knowledge to undertake pertinent interventions when managing polypharmacy and can play a major positive role in preventing adverse events. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on pediatric polypharmacy and provide insight into opportunities for pharmacists to help with management of polypharmacy. Information on adverse events, efficacy, and long-term outcomes with regard to growth and development of children subject to polypharmacy has yet to be published, leaving this realm of patient safety ripe for research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Other 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Psychology 3 8%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2015.
All research outputs
#12,484,497
of 16,372,192 outputs
Outputs from Integrated Pharmacy Research and Practice
#59
of 78 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,430
of 241,623 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Integrated Pharmacy Research and Practice
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,372,192 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 78 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,623 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.