↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Causes of visual impairment and blindness in children in three ecological regions of Nepal: Nepal Pediatric Ocular Diseases Study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Ophthalmology, August 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
67 Mendeley
Title
Causes of visual impairment and blindness in children in three ecological regions of Nepal: Nepal Pediatric Ocular Diseases Study
Published in
Clinical Ophthalmology, August 2015
DOI 10.2147/opth.s89431
Pubmed ID
Authors

Srijana Adhikari, Mohan Shrestha, Kamala Adhikari, Nhukesh Maharjan, Ujjowala Shrestha

Abstract

To study the causes of blindness and visual impairment in children in three ecologically diverse regions of Nepal. This is a baseline survey report of a 3-year longitudinal population-based study. One district each from the three ecological regions - Terai, Hills, and Mountains - was selected for the study. Village Development Committees from each district were selected by random sampling. Three community health workers were given training on vision screening and identification of abnormal ocular conditions in children. Health workers who examined children and collected data using pretested questionnaire performed house-to-house surveys. Children with abnormal vision or ocular conditions were referred to and examined by pediatric ophthalmologists. A total of 10,950 children aged 0-10 years, 5,403 from Terai, 3,204 from Hills, and 2,343 from Mountains, were enrolled in the study. Of them, 681 (6.2%) were nonresponders. The ratio of boys to girls was 1.03:1. Prevalence of blindness was 0.068% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02%-0.12%) and visual impairment was 0.097% (95% CI 0.04%-0.15%). Blindness was relatively more prevalent in Terai region (0.08%, 95% CI 0.02%-0.13%). The most common cause of blindness was amblyopia (42.9%) followed by congenital cataract. Corneal opacity (39%) was the most common cause of unilateral blindness. More than two-thirds of the causes that lead to blindness and visual impairment were potentially preventable. Further, nutritional and genetic studies are needed to determine the factors associated with ocular morbidity and blindness in these regions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 19%
Student > Master 12 18%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Other 4 6%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 45%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Psychology 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#14,235,639
of 22,824,164 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Ophthalmology
#1,223
of 3,183 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,021
of 264,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Ophthalmology
#23
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,824,164 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,183 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,261 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.