↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Periodic limb movements during REM sleep in multiple sclerosis: a previously undescribed entity

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Periodic limb movements during REM sleep in multiple sclerosis: a previously undescribed entity
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s83350
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian Veauthier, Gunnar Gaede, Helena Radbruch, Joern-Peter Sieb, Klaus-Dieter Wernecke, Friedemann Paul

Abstract

There are few studies describing periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in patients with narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, REM sleep behavior disorder, and spinal cord injury, and to a lesser extent, in insomnia patients and healthy controls, but no published cases in multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to investigate PLMS in REM sleep in MS and to analyze whether it is associated with age, sex, disability, and laboratory findings. From a study of MS patients originally published in 2011, we retrospectively analyzed periodic limb movements (PLMs) during REM sleep by classifying patients into two subgroups: PLM during REM sleep greater than or equal to ten per hour of REM sleep (n=7) vs less than ten per hour of REM sleep (n=59). A univariate analysis between PLM and disability, age, sex, laboratory findings, and polysomnographic data was performed. MS patients with more than ten PLMs per hour of REM sleep showed a significantly higher disability measured by the Kurtzke expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (P=0.023). The presence of more than ten PLMs per hour of REM sleep was associated with a greater likelihood of disability (odds ratio 22.1; 95% confidence interval 3.5-139.7; P<0.0001), whereas there were no differences in laboratory and other polysomnographic findings. PLMs during REM sleep were not described in MS earlier, and they are associated with disability measured by the EDSS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 37%
Neuroscience 4 15%
Psychology 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2015.
All research outputs
#3,839,042
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#543
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,472
of 241,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#25
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.