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Augmentation of light therapy in difficult-to-treat depressed patients: an open-label trial in both unipolar and bipolar patients

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
Title
Augmentation of light therapy in difficult-to-treat depressed patients: an open-label trial in both unipolar and bipolar patients
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s74861
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leone Beniamino, Giovanni Camardese, Riccardo Serrani, Coco Walstra, Marco Di Nicola, Giacomo Della Marca, Pietro Bria, Luigi Janiri

Abstract

We investigated the clinical benefits of bright light therapy (BLT) as an adjunct treatment to ongoing psychopharmacotherapy, both in unipolar and bipolar difficult-to-treat depressed (DTD) outpatients. In an open-label study, 31 depressed outpatients (16 unipolar and 15 bipolar) were included to undergo 3 weeks of BLT. Twenty-five completed the treatment and 5-week follow-up. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale and the Depression Retardation Rating Scale were used to assess changes in anhedonia and psychomotor retardation, respectively. The adjunctive BLT seemed to influence the course of the depressive episode, and a statistically significant reduction in HDRS scores was reported since the first week of therapy. The treatment was well-tolerated, and no patients presented clinical signs of (hypo)manic switch during the overall treatment period. At the end of the study (after 5 weeks from BLT discontinuation), nine patients (36%, eight unipolar and one bipolar) still showed a treatment response. BLT augmentation also led to a significant improvement of psychomotor retardation. BLT combined with the ongoing pharmacological treatment offers a simple approach, and it might be effective in rapidly ameliorating depressive core symptoms of vulnerable DTD outpatients. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trial on larger samples.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 25%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Librarian 2 8%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 29%
Psychology 5 21%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2015.
All research outputs
#8,378,983
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,162
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,243
of 241,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#69
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.