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Aging brain: the effect of combined cognitive and physical training on cognition as compared to cognitive and physical training alone – a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
Aging brain: the effect of combined cognitive and physical training on cognition as compared to cognitive and physical training alone – a systematic review
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, July 2018
DOI 10.2147/cia.s165399
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clémence Joubert, Hanna Chainay

Abstract

This review presents a critical examination of current knowledge of the impact of combined cognitive and physical training on cognition in healthy elderly subjects. The objectives are to evaluate the contribution of cognitive and physical training to the enhancement of cognition, and to determine the interest of combining these two training types in one intervention in terms of the benefits for cognition (direct and transfer), long-term maintenance, and transfer to daily living. To do so, a systematic electronic search was conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar. Exclusion criteria were animal and pathological aging studies. We focused on the shared and different behavioral impacts of these two types of training on cognition, as well as their functional and structural impact on the brain. The review indicates that both cognitive and physical training have an impact on cognition and on the brain. However, each type of training seems to preferentially enhance different cognitive functions and specifically impact both brain structure and function. Even though some results argue in favor of a complementarity between cognitive and physical training and the superiority of combined cognitive and physical training, the current state of knowledge does not permit any definitive conclusion. Thus, the present review indicates the need for additional investigations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 24%
Unspecified 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Researcher 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 5 24%
Unspecified 4 19%
Psychology 4 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Neuroscience 3 14%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,003,164
of 12,350,579 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#261
of 1,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,272
of 267,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#6
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,350,579 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,260 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.