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Cortical gyrification in schizophrenia: current perspectives

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
Title
Cortical gyrification in schizophrenia: current perspectives
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, July 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s145273
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yukihisa Matsuda, Kazutaka Ohi

Abstract

The cerebral cortex of the human brain has a complex morphological structure consisting of folded or smooth cortical surfaces. These morphological features are referred to as cortical gyrification and are characterized by the gyrification index (GI). A number of cortical gyrification studies have been published using the manual tracing GI, automated GI, and local GI in patients with schizophrenia. In this review, we highlighted abnormal cortical gyrification in patients with schizophrenia, first-episode schizophrenia, siblings of patients, and high-risk and at-risk individuals. Previous researches also indicated that abnormalities in cortical gyrification may underlie the severity of clinical symptoms, neurological soft signs, and executive functions. A substantial body of research has been conducted; however, some researches showed an increased GI, which is called as "hypergyria," and others showed a decreased GI, which is called as "hypogyria." We discussed that different GI methods and a wide variety of characteristics, such as age, sex, stage, and severity of illness, might be important reasons for the conflicting findings. These issues still need to be considered, and future studies should address them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 25%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 8 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 18 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Psychology 6 10%
Engineering 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 19 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2018.
All research outputs
#8,379,847
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,222
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,038
of 275,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#36
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,487 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.