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Pathogens in COPD exacerbations identified by comprehensive real-time PCR plus older methods

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, September 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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74 Mendeley
Title
Pathogens in COPD exacerbations identified by comprehensive real-time PCR plus older methods
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/copd.s82752
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenichiro Shimizu, Yutaka Yoshii, Miyuki Morozumi, Naoko Chiba, Kimiko Ubukata, Hironori Uruga, Shigeo Hanada, Nayuta Saito, Tsukasa Kadota, Hiroshi Wakui, Saburo Ito, Naoki Takasaka, Shunsuke Minagawa, Jun Kojima, Takanori Numata, Hiromichi Hara, Makoto Kawaishi, Keisuke Saito, Jun Araya, Yumi Kaneko, Katsutoshi Nakayama, Kazuma Kishi, Kazuyoshi Kuwano

Abstract

Respiratory infection is a major cause of exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Infectious contributions to exacerbations remain incompletely described. We therefore analyzed respiratory tract samples by comprehensive real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with conventional methods. We evaluated multiple risk factors for prolonged hospitalization to manage COPD exacerbations, including infectious agents. Over 19 months, we prospectively studied 46 patients with 50 COPD exacerbations, collecting nasopharyngeal swab and sputum samples from each. We carried out real-time PCR designed to detect six bacterial species and eleven viruses, together with conventional procedures, including sputum culture. Infectious etiologies of COPD exacerbations were identified in 44 of 50 exacerbations (88%). Infections were viral in 17 of 50 exacerbations (34%). COPD exacerbations caused by Gram-negative bacilli, including enteric and nonfermenting organisms, were significantly associated with prolonged hospitalization for COPD exacerbations. Our results support the use of a combination of real-time PCR and conventional methods for determining both infectious etiologies and risk of extended hospitalization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 70 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 18%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Other 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 31%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 7%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 14 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#16,331,691
of 21,005,902 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#1,638
of 2,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,466
of 263,302 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#67
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,005,902 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,200 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,302 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.