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New insights into the mechanisms of action of aspirin and its use in the prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thromboembolism

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
149 Mendeley
Title
New insights into the mechanisms of action of aspirin and its use in the prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thromboembolism
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s92222
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agon Mekaj, Ymer Mekaj, Fetije Daci

Abstract

The antithrombotic action of aspirin has long been recognized. Aspirin inhibits platelet function through irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity. Until recently, aspirin has been mainly used for primary and secondary prevention of arterial antithrombotic events. The aim of this study was to review the literature with regard to the various mechanisms of the newly discovered effects of aspirin in the prevention of the initiation and development of venous thrombosis. For this purpose, we used relevant data from the latest numerous scientific studies, including review articles, original research articles, double-blinded randomized controlled trials, a prospective combined analysis, a meta-analysis of randomized trials, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, and multicenter studies. Aspirin is used in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), especially the prevention of recurrent VTE in patients with unprovoked VTE who were treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Numerous studies have shown that aspirin reduces the rate of recurrent VTE in patients, following cessation of VKAs or NOACs. Furthermore, low doses of aspirin are suitable for long-term therapy in patients recovering from orthopedic or other surgeries. Aspirin is indicated for the primary and secondary prevention as well as the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease, acute ischemic stroke, and transient ischemic attack (especially in atrial fibrillation or mechanical heart valves). Aspirin can prevent or treat recurrent unprovoked VTEs as well as VTEs occurring after various surgeries or in patients with malignant disease. Recent trials have suggested that the long-term use of low-dose aspirin is effective not only in the prevention and treatment of arterial thrombosis but also in the prevention and treatment of VTE. Compared with VKAs and NOACs, aspirin has a reduced risk of bleeding.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 146 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 38 26%
Student > Master 23 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 8%
Researcher 11 7%
Other 10 7%
Other 25 17%
Unknown 30 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 38%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 20 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 33 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,910,811
of 14,083,287 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#459
of 1,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,810
of 248,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#30
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,083,287 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,006 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,549 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.