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Primary Whipple disease of the brain: case report with long-term clinical and MRI follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Primary Whipple disease of the brain: case report with long-term clinical and MRI follow-up
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s92066
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hana Malikova, Jan Peregrin

Abstract

Whipple disease (WD) is a rare systemic disorder caused by the bacteria Tropheryma whipplei. In its classic form, it manifests with gastrointestinal problems including diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss. However, various other systems can be affected, including the central nervous system (CNS). Even more rarely, the CNS is primarily affected without gastrointestinal symptoms and with a negative small bowel biopsy. The incidence of primary CNS WD is unknown. We report the case of a young female with the primary CNS form of WD. In this report, we highlight the main clinical features and diagnostic procedures that lead to the diagnosis and comment on the treatment and clinical response. We stress the importance of neuroimaging and brain biopsy. A unique feature of this case is that the patient has been followed up for 12 years. At the time of diagnosis, no neurological manifestations were detected, although a tumor-like lesion in the right temporal lobe and hypothalamic infiltration were present on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The first neurological manifestations developed 2 years later despite recommended antibiotic treatment, with cognitive impairment developing more than 10 years later. According to the MRI findings and clinical course, the disease was active for several years when multiple lesions on MRI appeared despite antibiotic therapy. In the discussion, we compare the present case with similar cases previously reported and we elaborate on the similarities and discrepancies in clinical features, diagnostic procedures, results, and treatment options.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 4%
United States 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 8 30%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 44%
Neuroscience 4 15%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Psychology 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2015.
All research outputs
#8,769,126
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,277
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,403
of 250,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#78
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,174 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.