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Glaucoma-service provision in Scotland: introduction and need for Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Ophthalmology, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Glaucoma-service provision in Scotland: introduction and need for Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines
Published in
Clinical Ophthalmology, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/opth.s91818
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andreas Syrogiannis, Alan Rotchford, Pankaj Kumar Agarwal, Manjula Kumarasamy, Donald Montgomery, Jennifer Burr, Roshini Sanders

Abstract

To describe the pattern of glaucoma-service delivery in Scotland and identify areas for improvement, taking into account Scottish General Ophthalmic Services (GOS) arrangements and the Eye Care Integration project, and to design Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) guidelines to refine the primary and secondary interface of glaucoma care. A glaucoma-survey questionnaire was sent to all consultant glaucomatologists in Scotland. The design of SIGN guidelines was based on the results of the questionnaire using SIGN methodology. Over 90% of Scottish glaucoma care is triaged and delivered within hospital services. Despite GOS referral, information is variable. There are no consistent discharge practices to the community. These results led to defined research questions that were answered, thus formulating the content of the SIGN guidelines. The guideline covers the assessment of patients in primary care, referral criteria to hospital, discharge criteria from hospital to community, and monitoring of patients at risk of glaucoma. With increasing age and limitations to hospital resources, refining glaucoma pathways between primary and secondary care has become a necessity. Scotland has unique eye care arrangements with both the GOS and Eye Care Integration project. It is hoped that implementation of SIGN guidelines will identify glaucoma at the earliest opportunity and reduce the rate of false-positive referrals to hospital.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 36%
Student > Master 3 27%
Librarian 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Researcher 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 27%
Psychology 1 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Unknown 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2015.
All research outputs
#7,048,546
of 12,488,808 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Ophthalmology
#506
of 1,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,726
of 246,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Ophthalmology
#22
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,488,808 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,597 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,662 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.