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Serotonin syndrome induced by the readministration of escitalopram after a short-term interruption in an elderly woman with depression: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
Title
Serotonin syndrome induced by the readministration of escitalopram after a short-term interruption in an elderly woman with depression: a case report
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s92081
Pubmed ID
Authors

Norio Yasui-Furukori, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Yasushi Sato

Abstract

Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal side effect of antidepressants that results from the effects of drug activity on both central and peripheral serotonergic receptors. A 78-year-old Japanese female with a 2-year history of major depressive disorder was treated with escitalopram (10 mg/d), risperidone (1 mg/d), and nitrazepam (5 mg/d). One month after beginning this drug regimen, she was transferred to the emergency department and immediately hospitalized due to suspicion of a urinary tract infection and dehydration. All psychotropic drugs were discontinued. Five days later, the patient's physical condition had recovered; therefore, the same dose of escitalopram (10 mg/d) was readministered. The patient subsequently developed convulsions accompanied by impaired consciousness, high fever, and myoclonus of both upper extremities. The tendon reflexes of both lower extremities were enhanced. Based on these clinical signs and symptoms, we suspected serotonin syndrome; therefore, escitalopram was discontinued, and a fluid infusion was initiated. The patient recovered from all symptoms within 3 weeks without receiving additional antidepressants. This case suggests that the careless readministration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is harmful to at-risk patients, like those in poor physical condition and the elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Master 5 21%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Psychology 3 13%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2015.
All research outputs
#8,769,115
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,275
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,516
of 250,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#78
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,612 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.