↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

The clinicopathological significance and drug target potential of FHIT in breast cancer, a meta-analysis and literature review

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
The clinicopathological significance and drug target potential of FHIT in breast cancer, a meta-analysis and literature review
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s89861
Pubmed ID
Authors

Junming Xu, Xiaoli Wang, Jun Li, Lijun Xu, Ynushu Su

Abstract

FHIT is a bona fide tumor-suppressor gene and its loss contributes to tumorigenesis of epithelial cancers including breast cancer (BC). However, the association and clinicopathological significance between FHIT promoter hypermethylation and BC remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis and literature review to investigate the clinicopathological significance of FHIT methylation in BC. A detailed literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. The data were extracted and assessed by two reviewers independently. Odds ratios with 95% corresponding confidence intervals were calculated. A total of seven relevant articles were available for meta-analysis, which included 985 patients. The frequency of FHIT hypermethylation was significantly increased in invasive ductal carcinoma compared to benign breast disease, the pooled odds ratio was 8.43, P<0.00001. The rate of FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly different between stage I/II and stage III/IV, odds ratio was 2.98, P=0.06. In addition, FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly associated with ER and PR status. FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly correlated with premenopausal and postmenopausal patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. In summary, our meta-analysis indicated that the frequency of FHIT hypermethylation was significantly increased in BC compared to benign breast disease. The rate of FHIT hypermethylation in advanced stages of BC was higher than in earlier stages; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Our data suggested that FHIT methylation could be a diagnostic biomarker of BC carcinogenesis. FHIT is a potential drug target for development of demethylation treatment for patients with BC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 14%
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Mathematics 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2015.
All research outputs
#4,722,907
of 6,391,435 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#460
of 891 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,434
of 191,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#66
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,391,435 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 891 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,702 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.