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Effect of depressive symptoms on the length of hospital stay among patients hospitalized for acute stroke in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
Effect of depressive symptoms on the length of hospital stay among patients hospitalized for acute stroke in Japan
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s91303
Pubmed ID
Authors

Norio Sugawara, Norifumi Metoki, Joji Hagii, Shin Saito, Hiroshi Shiroto, Tetsu Tomita, Minoru Yasujima, Ken Okumura, Norio Yasui-Furukori

Abstract

Depression after stroke is one of the most serious complications of stroke. Although many studies have shown that the length of hospital stay (LOHS) is a measurable and important stroke outcome, research has found limited evidence concerning the effect of depression on LOHS among patients who have experienced acute stroke. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of depression on LOHS among patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke in Japan. We retrospectively examined 421 patients who had experienced acute ischemic stroke. Stroke severity was measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on the 7th day of hospitalization. On the 10th day of hospitalization, depressive symptoms and functional assessment were assessed by the Japan Stroke Scale (Depression Scale) and the Functional Independence Measure, respectively. A general linear model was employed to assess the effect of probable depression on LOHS. The prevalence of probable depression in the current sample was 16.3% in males and 17.8% in females. The mean LOHS of participants with probable depression (76.4±49.2 days) was significantly longer than that of participants without probable depression (44.9±39.2 days). An analysis using the general linear model to assess the effect on LOHS revealed a significant interaction between the presence of probable depression and NIHSS scores. Depression after stroke was associated with significant increases in LOHS. Early detection and treatment for depression are necessary for patients with ischemic stroke.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 24%
Unspecified 2 8%
Librarian 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 7 28%
Unknown 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Psychology 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2015.
All research outputs
#13,214,896
of 22,829,683 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,243
of 2,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,029
of 274,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#39
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,829,683 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,986 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.