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Cigarette smoke is a risk factor for severity and treatment outcome in patients with culture-positive tuberculosis

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
Title
Cigarette smoke is a risk factor for severity and treatment outcome in patients with culture-positive tuberculosis
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s87218
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hsiao-Chi Chuang, Mauo-Ying Bien, Chien-Ling Su, Hui-Chiao Liu, Po-Hao Feng, Kang-Yun Lee, Kai-Jen Chuang, Chun-Nin Lee

Abstract

Smoking has been associated with tuberculosis (TB); however, the effects of smoking on the effectiveness of TB treatment remain unclear. Data were retrieved from case notes and interviews of subjects registered in the TB-reporting system from 2010 to 2012. Study cases were defined as subjects with TB-positive sputum cultures, whereas the controls were defined as subjects with non-TB-related pulmonary diseases. Statistical analyses included logistic regression and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models. A total of 245 cases with cultures positive for TB and 114 controls with non-TB-related pulmonary diseases and negative sputum cultures were recruited. Current smokers had the highest failure rate (33%) for TB treatment, and they had the most severe pulmonary lesions based on chest X-ray grading. Current smokers had a 1.36-fold (95% confidence interval 1.03-2.36, P<0.05) higher odds ratio for cultures positive for TB compared with nonsmokers. In subjects with TB-positive cultures, current smoking was associated with an increase in treatment days required for cultures to convert from positive to negative (hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.39; P<0.05). Longer periods of treatment may be required for TB patients who are current smokers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
Unknown 73 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Student > Master 10 14%
Researcher 6 8%
Lecturer 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 23 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 25 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2015.
All research outputs
#6,488,581
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#357
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,895
of 250,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#18
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,285 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.