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Schizophrenia and risk of dementia: a meta-analysis study

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
Title
Schizophrenia and risk of dementia: a meta-analysis study
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2018
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s172933
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laisheng Cai, Jingwei Huang

Abstract

Evidence suggests that schizophrenia may be associated with an increased risk of dementia, but results from prior studies have been inconsistent. This study aimed to estimate the relationship between schizophrenia and incident dementia using a quantitative meta-analysis. Several databases were used to gather relevant information, including PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, with the publication date of articles limited up to December 23, 2017. All studies reported a multivariate-adjusted estimate, represented as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for the association between schizophrenia and risk of dementia incidence. Pooled RRs were calculated using a random-effects model. Six studies met our inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis, which included 206,694 cases of dementia and 5,063,316 participants. All individuals were without dementia at baseline. Overall, the quantitative meta-analysis suggested that subjects with schizophrenia were associated with a significantly greater risk of dementia incidence (RR 2.29; 95% CI 1.35-3.88) than those without. The results of this meta-analysis indicate that individuals with schizophrenia may have an increased risk for the development of dementia. Future studies should explore whether schizophrenia is a modifiable risk factor for dementia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Researcher 6 10%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 17 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 19%
Psychology 9 14%
Neuroscience 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 20 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2020.
All research outputs
#2,747,404
of 17,803,527 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#400
of 2,692 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,926
of 284,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#7
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,803,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,692 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,830 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.