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Electroencephalography signatures of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: clinical utility

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
Title
Electroencephalography signatures of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: clinical utility
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, October 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s51783
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julian Gonzalez, Guzmán Alba, Ernesto Pereda, Soledad Mañas, Almudena González, Leopoldo Méndez

Abstract

The techniques and the most important results on the use of electroencephalography (EEG) to extract different measures are reviewed in this work, which can be clinically useful to study subjects with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). First, we discuss briefly and in simple terms the EEG analysis and processing techniques most used in the context of ADHD. We review techniques that both analyze individual EEG channels (univariate measures) and study the statistical interdependence between different EEG channels (multivariate measures), the so-called functional brain connectivity. Among the former ones, we review the classical indices of absolute and relative spectral power and estimations of the complexity of the channels, such as the approximate entropy and the Lempel-Ziv complexity. Among the latter ones, we focus on the magnitude square coherence and on different measures based on the concept of generalized synchronization and its estimation in the state space. Second, from a historical point of view, we present the most important results achieved with these techniques and their clinical utility (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy) to diagnose ADHD. Finally, we propose future research lines based on these results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 78 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 18%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Master 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 27%
Neuroscience 14 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 11%
Engineering 7 9%
Computer Science 4 5%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 19 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2016.
All research outputs
#13,215,559
of 22,830,751 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,243
of 2,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,031
of 274,921 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#39
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,830,751 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,986 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,921 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.