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Rates and factors associated with falls in older European Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, African-Americans, and Hispanics

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Rates and factors associated with falls in older European Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, African-Americans, and Hispanics
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2015
DOI 10.2147/cia.s91120
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edgar Vieira, Ruth Tappen, Gabriella Engstrom, Bruno da Costa

Abstract

To evaluate rates and factors associated with older adult falls in different ethnic groups. Information on demographics, medical and falls history, and pain and physical activity levels was collected from 550 community-dwelling older adults (75±9 years old, 222 European Americans, 109 Afro-Caribbeans, 106 African-Americans, and 113 Hispanics). Taking medications for anxiety (risk ratio [RR] =1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.1-2.0), having incontinence (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.1-1.8, P=0.013), back pain (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.0-1.8), feet swelling (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.1-1.7), and age ≥75 years (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.0-1.6) were associated with falls. The associations were stronger for Afro-Caribbeans, but they presented approximately 40% lower prevalence of falls than the other groups. Taking anxiety medication, incontinence, back pain, feet swelling, and age ≥75 years were associated with falls, and Afro-Caribbeans presented lower prevalence of falls. These findings need to be taken into consideration in clinical interventions in aging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Researcher 5 14%
Unspecified 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Other 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 22%
Unspecified 6 16%
Psychology 3 8%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,671,324
of 6,496,325 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#385
of 844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,680
of 208,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#27
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,496,325 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 844 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,492 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.