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The financial burden of sickle cell disease on households in Ekiti, Southwest Nigeria.

Overview of attention for article published in ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
The financial burden of sickle cell disease on households in Ekiti, Southwest Nigeria.
Published in
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR, November 2015
DOI 10.2147/ceor.s86599
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oladele Olatunya, Olatunde Ogundare, Joseph Fadare, Oludare Oluwayemi, Oyinkansola Agaja, Babajide Adeyefa, Odunayo Aderiye

Abstract

Studies on economic impact of sickle cell disease (SCD) are scanty despite its being common among children in developing countries who are mostly Africans. To determine the financial burden of SCD on households in Ado Ekiti, Southwest Nigeria. A longitudinal and descriptive study of household expenditures on care of 111 children with SCD managed at the pediatric hematology unit of the Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital was conducted between January and December 2014. There were 64 male and 47 female children involved, aged between 15 and 180 months. They were from 111 households, out of which only eight (7.2%) were enrolled under the National Health Insurance Scheme. The number of admissions and outpatients' consultations ranged from 1 to 5 and 1 to 10 per child, respectively. Malaria, vaso-occlusive crisis, and severe anemia were the leading comorbidities. The monthly household income ranged between ₦12,500 and ₦330,000 (US$76 and US$2,000) with a median of ₦55,000 (US$333), and health expenditure ranged between ₦2,500 and ₦215,000 (US$15 and US$1,303) with a mean of ₦39,554±35,479 (US$240±215). Parents of 63 children lost between 1 and 48 working days due to their children's ill health. Parents of 23 children took loans ranging between ₦6,500 and ₦150,000 (US$39 and US$909) to offset hospital bills. The percentage of family income spent as health expenditure on each child ranged from 0.38 to 34.4. Catastrophic health expenditure (when the health expenditure >10% of family income) occurred in 23 (20.7%) households. Parents who took loan to offset hospital bills, low social class, and patients who took ill during the study period significantly had higher odds for catastrophic health expenditure (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.399-87.176, P=0.000; 95% CI 2.322-47.310, P=0.002; and 95% CI 1.128-29.694, P=0.035, respectively). SCD poses enormous financial burden on parents and households.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 4%
Zimbabwe 1 4%
Unknown 23 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 20%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Postgraduate 4 16%
Lecturer 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Other 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 52%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 20%
Unspecified 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Other 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2015.
All research outputs
#2,472,648
of 6,640,754 outputs
Outputs from ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR
#86
of 238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,671
of 210,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research: CEOR
#9
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,640,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 238 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.