↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Development of oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone nanoparticles for the management of pediatric asthma

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
Title
Development of oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone nanoparticles for the management of pediatric asthma
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, November 2015
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s86075
Pubmed ID
Authors

He Zhang, Mei Han, Yun Tian, Jie Zhang, Shu Li, DaSheng Yang, Yi-Dan Chen, Zhong-Yuan Liang, Yan-Yan Cen

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to develop oral dispersible tablets containing prednisolone (PDS)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC 101), lactose, and croscarmellose sodium (CCS). The PDS-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were formulated by ionotropic external gelation technique in order to enhance the solubility of PDS in salivary pH. Prepared nanoparticles were used for the development of oral fast disintegrating tablets by direct compression method. The prepared tablets were evaluated for disintegration time (DT), in vitro drug release (DR), thickness, weight variation, drug content uniformity, friability, and hardness. The effect of concentrations of the dependent variables (MCC, lactose, CCS) on DT and in vitro DR was studied. Fast disintegrating tablets of PDS can be prepared by using MCC, CCS, and lactose with enhanced solubility of PDS. The minimum DT was found to be 15 seconds, and the maximum DR within 30 minutes was 98.50%. All independent variables selected for the study were statistically significant. Oral fast disintegrating tablets containing PDS nanoparticles could be the better choice for the pediatric patients that would result in better patient compliance. From this study, it can be concluded that fast disintegrating tablets could be a potential drug delivery technology for the management of asthma in pediatrics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 32%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 15 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Chemistry 2 5%
Chemical Engineering 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2016.
All research outputs
#5,163,384
of 7,200,541 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#420
of 941 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,929
of 282,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#50
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,200,541 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 941 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.