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Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

Overview of attention for article published in Patient preference and adherence, November 2015
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58 Mendeley
Title
Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants
Published in
Patient preference and adherence, November 2015
DOI 10.2147/ppa.s88994
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pfeilschifter, Sebastian Luger, Carina Hohmann, Daniela Niemann, Peter Kraft, Ignaz Gunreben, Tobias Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph Kleinschnitz, Helmuth Steinmetz, Christian Foerch

Abstract

Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients' adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209). A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243) with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90%) and patients who switch therapy most commonly switch toward another OAT. The 1-year adherence rates to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention do not differ significantly between both therapeutic strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Slovenia 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Ireland 1 2%
Unknown 55 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 24%
Student > Bachelor 12 21%
Student > Master 10 17%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Other 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 55%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Unspecified 3 5%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Other 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,884,892
of 6,602,221 outputs
Outputs from Patient preference and adherence
#540
of 677 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,711
of 249,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Patient preference and adherence
#40
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,602,221 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 677 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,611 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.